Interviewing for a Career

Stress when interviewing is something I struggle with, as well as many other people. Interviewing can be extremely stressful, as you want to portray your best self for future employers and have everything perfect. It is easy to get caught up in trying to perfect your resumes and cover letters; however, I have discovered some tips from author Laura DeCarlo on job-hunt.org to help myself (and hopefully others) to overcome the stress of having to interview.

1. Use visual imagery to reduce stress.

2. Persuade yourself with positive, rational thinking.

3. Reduce the importance of the event in your mind.

4. Reduce uncertainties.

5. Listen to music or relaxation tapes to calm yourself.

6. Use Progressive Muscular Relaxation.

7. Perform slow, deep breathing.

I really liked how Laura DeCarlo’s article titled, How to Beat Pre-Interview Stress: 7 techniques, was broken down into three categories of how to deal with stress on a Mental, Environmental, and Physical level. I feel that sometimes we just think of stress as being strictly mental, but as mentioned by DeCarlo, we can experience stressors from our environment, as well as in the form of physical signs stemming from our bodies. In addition to Laura DeCarlo’s seven techniques for reducing stress, I personally believe that the more you practice interviewing, the better the interview will go. When I know I have an interview coming up, I always make sure to research the company that I am interviewing for and also making sure I know the location of the interview. There is nothing worse than discovering the morning of the interview that you are not sure of the location! Always remember that it is better to over-prepare for something rather than being under-prepared and understand that knowledge equals power. I also think that focusing on success is extremely vital for a great interviewing experience. Know your worth and do not be afraid to prove it! A quote that always gets me through stressful and intimidating interviews is from Winston Churchill, where he stated “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

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Written by: Katie McCrory

Monica Manuel